The Calton Hill Beltane Festival 2018

The Calton Hill Beltane Festival 2018

Pictures – All right reserved. 

Every year, The Beltane Festival gathers hundreds of people to celebrate the coming of Summer on Calton Hill, in Edinburgh. This modern reimagining takes its roots in an ancient Celtic festival marking the changing seasons. Everyone comes together to celebrate the end of Winter and the beginning of Spring in a mix of music, fire and physical performances.

The festival draws all kind of street performers, split into different groups, each having its own theme for the costumes the put on according to the characters they represent. You will encounter the Blues, keepers of the ritual, the Whites, companions of the May Queen and the Reds, those who embody chaos.

Body painting, loose leaves, and long feathers are all common parts of their costumes. The performers are also not afraid to show a little (or even a lot of) skin! The many entertainers demonstrate their skills in acting, dancing and acrobatics often mixed with impressive pyrotechnics. Fire has a significant place and meaning throughout the festival, as it symbolises warmth during the cold night. Beltane’s many fires literally burn the last traces of Winter away, enabling Spring to come out of their ashes.

Enter a journey from sunset through the middle of the night, and watch all the rituals that make this event so special come to life in this video.

Harry Potter: Walk in the Footsteps of the World’s Most Famous Wizard

Harry Potter: Walk in the Footsteps of the World’s Most Famous Wizard

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for quite some time, you must have heard of Harry Potter and the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. After 7 novels and 8 movies the worldwide phenomenon has attracted countless tourists and fans in London and Oxford, but did you know that Scotland is closely related to this magical world?

Here are some famous sites every Potterhead should visit on their next trip to Scotland!

The Elephant House, Edinburgh

The Harry Potter author, J.K. Rowling, moved to Edinburgh in 1993 and The Elephant House is one of the cafés she used to go to in order to write her first novel, Harry Potter and the Philosopher Stone. The coffee house is constantly flooded by fans trying to retrace the steps of their favourite author, and maybe, who knows … get inspired themselves!

Victoria Street, Edinburgh

As Rowling lived in Edinburgh for several years, it’s only natural that she looked around her for inspiration when writing her novels. For example, Victoria Street was her main inspiration for the mysterious and magical Diagon Alley, where the young Harry Potter bought his first year’s school supplies. If you dare venture into this wizarding street, don’t hesitate to stop by Diagon House or The Boy Wizard, two Harry Potter Shops where you will find all the magical supplies you need.

Tom Riddle’s Grave, Greyfriars Kirkyard

Victoria Street is not the only part of Edinburgh that inspired the author. With a 7-novel series, you can imagine the number of characters evolving in Rowling’s work and all the names the author has had to make up for them. Hidden away in Greyfriars Kirkyard, some very interesting tombstones can be found, which most likely helped Rowling in the naming process of some of her characters: Tom Riddle, McGonagall, Moodies, etc. Walk down the graveyard’s alleys for more spooky discoveries!

 

 

The Balmoral Hotel, Edinburgh

This beautiful Victorian luxury hotel was once Rowling’s safe haven. She frequently visited the hotel while she was finishing Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Room 552, now renamed the J.K. Rowling Suite in her honour still holds the desk and chair where the author sat to write.

 

Rowling’s handprint, the Edinburgh City Chambers

The Edinburgh City Chambers is another stop HP fans will not want to miss when visiting Edinburgh. Rowling’s handprints can be found on a flagstone in the quadrangle in front of the City Chambers. The prints were set in 2008 when Rowling received the Edinburgh Award.

 

George Heriot’s School: Edinburgh’s very own Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry

Although nobody except Rowling really knows where Hogwarts really is located, many believe that the castle was inspired by George Heriot’s School in Edinburgh. The gothic architecture of the breath-taking school situated in the city centre will undoubtedly remind fans of Harry’s beloved school. Even the four houses of Hogwarts may have been inspired by the George Heriots School’s four towers!

 

Glennfinan Viaduct – All aboard the Hogwarts Express

Hidden in the depth of the Scottish Highlands, this railway is famous for being featured in the Harry Potter movies. Harry Potter enthusiasts will be happy to know that the Hogwarts Express is no longer only reserved for Wizards: Muggles can now journey across Western Scotland on board the famous steam train just as Harry and his friends did!

 

Scottish landscapes

Finally, Scotland’s countryside is packed with breath-taking landscapes which are heavily featured in the Harry Potter movies.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BI-y2dLAS27/?tagged=eileannamoine

 

First time in Edinburgh? Here’s your guide to connecting with other students

First time in Edinburgh? Here’s your guide to connecting with other students

Connecting with other students can be a simple and easy thing to do, but sometimes it requires a little energy and effort. Especially when the other students do not speak your mother tongue or come from a different culture. Fortunately, there are tips and methods that can be used in order to make contact, both in and out of the school. Here are some ideas:

Courses can be a good way to exchange ideas, present yourself to others, and sometimes even make some funny jokes. At inlingua, students are encouraged to speak as much as possible in English, so you will have plenty of opportunities to chat with your fellow classmates.

a-inlingua-edinburgh-students-classroom-7-copy

Social programmes are an excellent way to connect with other students as you will have plenty of time to carry on discussions with each other outside the school. By walking together through the streets or waiting for the bus, you surely will ask your class mates more than once where they come from and what they usually do in their country. On top of that, social programmes are an excellent way to discover the city you live in and try some new activities that can be fun and entertaining. So, next time there is a social activity, put yourself on the list!

SONY DSC

Social media is also a good way to keep in touch with your school mates. If you had a good time with somebody, why don’t you exchange phone numbers? Or you could even exchange your name and chat on WhatsApp, Facebook or Skype. So, next time you go out, you could phone them and organise a rendezvous.

Image result for social media mobile phone

See Our Erasmus + Courses on Film!

See Our Erasmus + Courses on Film!

We had a record number of teachers studying with us through the Erasmus + programme this summer! As part of the course, teachers from all over the world can explore Scottish history through a variety of cultural activities. Here is a selection of videos from our YouTube channel to see what they got up to:

The Scottish Parliament

 

Georgian House

 

Whisky Tasting

 

Our Erasmus + courses take place all year round and we still have some spaces available for 2016! Find out more here.

EdFringe – Get ready for this year’s biggest event in Edinburgh

EdFringe – Get ready for this year’s biggest event in Edinburgh

The Edinburgh Festival Fringe (also known simply as “the Fringe”) is a major event which takes place every year. For 25 days in August, Edinburgh is completely transformed with thousands of performers flocking to the capital for a chance to showcase their work in one of hundreds of venues around the city centre.


The Fringe started in 1947 when a handful of theatre companies turned up uninvited to the official Edinburgh International Festival to perform for the large theatre crowds that had already gathered in the city. From these humble beginnings, the festival has now grown into the largest arts festival in the world and, in 2014, the Fringe featured a record number of 3,193 shows.

The Festival is supported by the Festival Fringe Society, which publishes the programme, sells tickets to all events from a central physical box office and website, and offers year-round advice and support to performers. The Society’s permanent location is at the Fringe Shop on the Royal Mile, and in August they also manage Fringe Central, a separate collection of spaces in Appleton Tower and other University of Edinburgh buildings, dedicated to providing support for Fringe participants during their time at the festival.

The Edinburgh Military Tattoo

Even today, any act in the world can sign up to perform at the Fringe so you will always find an extremely varied mix of shows, from established celebrities and musicians to student theatre companies and aspiring artists. Popular acts featured in the festival include cabaret, comedy, dance, live music, theatre and circus.

 

This year the festival will take place from 5th – 29th August and you can see the full schedule here. Don’t forget you can also explore the best the festival has to offer with our English Plus Festivals course! We’ll also have the chance to visit the Fringe on our social programme throughout August.

Look out for these other festivals happening in August too!

Edinburgh Art Festival (28th July – 28th August)

Edinburgh International Festival (5th August – 29th August)

The Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo (5th – 27th August)

Edinburgh International Book Festival (13th – 29th August)

Edinburgh Mela (27th – 28th August)

Visit the beautiful Georgian House in Edinburgh

Visit the beautiful Georgian House in Edinburgh

We like to organise weekly activities to help our students to discover Scottish culture. Yesterday a group of students went to the Georgian House. Situated in the historic Charlotte Square, the Georgian House provides a glimpse into 18th century life in the New Town.

Charlottesq2

The Georgian House is part of Robert Adam’s masterpiece of urban design, Charlotte Square. It dates back to 1796, when those who could afford it began to escape from the cramped, squalid conditions of Edinburgh’s Old Town to settle in the fashionable New Town. The house’s beautiful china, shining silver, exquisite paintings and furniture all reflect the domestic surroundings and social conditions of the times.

The Georgian House - Edinburgh - Social Programme

The Georgian House is in the care of the National Trust for Scotland.

Opening times & Prices

  • Monday to Saturday (10.00 – 18.00)
  • Admission is free for members and holders of the Great British Heritage Pass.
  • Adult: £7.00
  • Family: £16.50
  • 1 Parent: £11.50
  • Concession: £5.50 (Students)

Location

The National Trust For Scotland,
7 Charlotte Square,
Edinburgh,
City Of Edinburgh,
EH2 4DR

http://www.nts.org.uk/Property/Georgian-House/

Translate »