Pancake Day the British Way!

Pancake Day the British Way!

Pancake Day is also known as Shrove Tuesday in the UK and takes place on Tuesday 28th February this year. It marks the last day before the Christian festival of Lent which is generally a period of abstinence. It is customary to eat pancakes on this day as pancake recipes used up food that was traditionally given up for Lent such as eggs, milk, butter and sugar.

Pancake

Wherever you are in the world, join us in making the perfect pancakes with this recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 100g plain flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 300ml milk
  • 50g butter

Method:

1. Pour the flour through a sieve into a large mixing bowl and dig a little hole in the centre. Add the eggs into the hole and pour in about 50ml milk. Start whisking the mixture together from the centre and beat until you have a smooth, thick paste. Then, continue to whisk whilst steadily pouring in the rest of the milk until you have a batter that is the same consistency of a relatively thick single cream.

2. Grease the frying pan with some of the butter and heat over a moderate temperature. Then, pour a small part of the mixture over the pan, tilting it to allow the mixture to settle in a thin and even layer. Return the pan to the heat and allow the mixture to cook for around 30 seconds.

3. To cook the pancake on the other side, you can either turn it over carefully with a spatula, or if you’re feeling adventurous, you can flip it using the pan (we only recommend this flipping technique for more experienced pancake-makers!). Cook for a futher 30 seconds and you should have the perfect golden pancake! Repeat stages 3 and 4 for each extra pancake. If you follow this recipe, you should have enough mixture to make around 8 pancakes.

4. Add your favourite toppings! For this section, you can add savoury toppings such as ham and cheese for a lunchtime snack or sweet toppings to make a dessert. We love to top our pancakes with lemon and sugar, jam and ice cream or Nutella and strawberries.

First time in Edinburgh? Here’s your guide to connecting with other students

First time in Edinburgh? Here’s your guide to connecting with other students

Connecting with other students can be a simple and easy thing to do, but sometimes it requires a little energy and effort. Especially when the other students do not speak your mother tongue or come from a different culture. Fortunately, there are tips and methods that can be used in order to make contact, both in and out of the school. Here are some ideas:

Courses can be a good way to exchange ideas, present yourself to others, and sometimes even make some funny jokes. At inlingua, students are encouraged to speak as much as possible in English, so you will have plenty of opportunities to chat with your fellow classmates.

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Social programmes are an excellent way to connect with other students as you will have plenty of time to carry on discussions with each other outside the school. By walking together through the streets or waiting for the bus, you surely will ask your class mates more than once where they come from and what they usually do in their country. On top of that, social programmes are an excellent way to discover the city you live in and try some new activities that can be fun and entertaining. So, next time there is a social activity, put yourself on the list!

SONY DSC

Social media is also a good way to keep in touch with your school mates. If you had a good time with somebody, why don’t you exchange phone numbers? Or you could even exchange your name and chat on WhatsApp, Facebook or Skype. So, next time you go out, you could phone them and organise a rendezvous.

Image result for social media mobile phone

See Our Erasmus + Courses on Film!

See Our Erasmus + Courses on Film!

We had a record number of teachers studying with us through the Erasmus + programme this summer! As part of the course, teachers from all over the world can explore Scottish history through a variety of cultural activities. Here is a selection of videos from our YouTube channel to see what they got up to:

The Scottish Parliament

 

Georgian House

 

Whisky Tasting

 

Our Erasmus + courses take place all year round and we still have some spaces available for 2016! Find out more here.

EdFringe – Get ready for this year’s biggest event in Edinburgh

EdFringe – Get ready for this year’s biggest event in Edinburgh

The Edinburgh Festival Fringe (also known simply as “the Fringe”) is a major event which takes place every year. For 25 days in August, Edinburgh is completely transformed with thousands of performers flocking to the capital for a chance to showcase their work in one of hundreds of venues around the city centre.


The Fringe started in 1947 when a handful of theatre companies turned up uninvited to the official Edinburgh International Festival to perform for the large theatre crowds that had already gathered in the city. From these humble beginnings, the festival has now grown into the largest arts festival in the world and, in 2014, the Fringe featured a record number of 3,193 shows.

The Festival is supported by the Festival Fringe Society, which publishes the programme, sells tickets to all events from a central physical box office and website, and offers year-round advice and support to performers. The Society’s permanent location is at the Fringe Shop on the Royal Mile, and in August they also manage Fringe Central, a separate collection of spaces in Appleton Tower and other University of Edinburgh buildings, dedicated to providing support for Fringe participants during their time at the festival.

The Edinburgh Military Tattoo

Even today, any act in the world can sign up to perform at the Fringe so you will always find an extremely varied mix of shows, from established celebrities and musicians to student theatre companies and aspiring artists. Popular acts featured in the festival include cabaret, comedy, dance, live music, theatre and circus.

 

This year the festival will take place from 5th – 29th August and you can see the full schedule here. Don’t forget you can also explore the best the festival has to offer with our English Plus Festivals course! We’ll also have the chance to visit the Fringe on our social programme throughout August.

Look out for these other festivals happening in August too!

Edinburgh Art Festival (28th July – 28th August)

Edinburgh International Festival (5th August – 29th August)

The Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo (5th – 27th August)

Edinburgh International Book Festival (13th – 29th August)

Edinburgh Mela (27th – 28th August)

Visit the beautiful Georgian House in Edinburgh

Visit the beautiful Georgian House in Edinburgh

We like to organise weekly activities to help our students to discover Scottish culture. Yesterday a group of students went to the Georgian House. Situated in the historic Charlotte Square, the Georgian House provides a glimpse into 18th century life in the New Town.

Charlottesq2

The Georgian House is part of Robert Adam’s masterpiece of urban design, Charlotte Square. It dates back to 1796, when those who could afford it began to escape from the cramped, squalid conditions of Edinburgh’s Old Town to settle in the fashionable New Town. The house’s beautiful china, shining silver, exquisite paintings and furniture all reflect the domestic surroundings and social conditions of the times.

The Georgian House - Edinburgh - Social Programme

The Georgian House is in the care of the National Trust for Scotland.

Opening times & Prices

  • Monday to Saturday (10.00 – 18.00)
  • Admission is free for members and holders of the Great British Heritage Pass.
  • Adult: £7.00
  • Family: £16.50
  • 1 Parent: £11.50
  • Concession: £5.50 (Students)

Location

The National Trust For Scotland,
7 Charlotte Square,
Edinburgh,
City Of Edinburgh,
EH2 4DR

http://www.nts.org.uk/Property/Georgian-House/

The Edinburgh Festival Fringe (the Largest Arts Festival in the World!)

The Edinburgh Festival Fringe (the Largest Arts Festival in the World!)

Images above: © Edinburgh Festival Fringe Society

The Edinburgh Festival Fringe (also known simply as “the Fringe”) is a major event which takes place every year. For 25 days in August, Edinburgh is completely transformed with thousands of performers flocking to the capital for a chance to showcase their work in one of hundreds of venues around the city centre.

Festival

© Edinburgh Festival Fringe Society

The Fringe started in 1947 when a handful of theatre companies turned up uninvited to the official Edinburgh International Festival to perform for the large theatre crowds that had already gathered in the city. From these humble beginnings, the festival has now grown into the largest arts festival in the world and, in 2014, the Fringe featured a record number of 3,193 shows.

Fringe Performer

Even today, any act in the world can sign up to perform at the Fringe so you will always find an extremely varied mix of shows, from established celebrities and musicians to student theatre companies and aspiring artists. Popular acts featured in the festival include cabaret, comedy, dance, live music, theatre and circus.

Underbelly's Hullabaloo - 03

This year the festival will take place from 5th – 29th August and you can see the full schedule here. Don’t forget you can also explore the best the festival has to offer with our English Plus Festivals course! We’ll also have the chance to visit the Fringe on our social programme throughout August.

Flyers at the Fringe

Look out for these other festivals happening in August too!

Edinburgh Art Festival (28th July – 28th August)

Edinburgh International Festival (5th August – 29th August)

The Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo (5th – 27th August)

Edinburgh International Book Festival (13th – 29th August)

Edinburgh Mela (27th – 28th August)

 

 

 

 

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