Why Spring is the Perfect Time to Visit Edinburgh

Why Spring is the Perfect Time to Visit Edinburgh

20Image: Flickr (Adam Jackson Bell)

We love Edinburgh all year round but spring can be a fantastic time to see the city at its best. Here are some reasons why we think spring is the perfect time to visit Edinburgh…

It’s actually quite sunny

Good morning from Edinburgh! #edinburgh #castle #sunny #summer #festival

March, April and May are some of the sunniest months in Edinburgh with the least rainfall. There may be a winter chill in the air but spring is definitely one of the best seasons to get out and explore the cities streets and parks.

The city is in full bloom

The cherry-blossomed Meadows, Edinburgh

Spring is one of the rare occasions to see Edinburgh’s beautiful cherry blossom trees in full bloom. Take a walk through the Meadows and enjoy a flurry of pink petals in the sunshine.

It’s not too busy

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Spring is still well before the mega tourist influx August so you can enjoy the city’s best attractions without having to queue (as much).

There is plenty to do

Polargraph at Edinburgh Science Festival

The International Science Festival, the Hidden Door Festival and World Whisky Day all take place before the summer months arrive.

And lastly… you can see the spectacular Beltane Fire Festival

Beltane 09 - Fire

The Beltane Fire Festival event takes place every year on the 30th April and celebrates the beginning of the summer season. This ancient Gaelic pagan tradition involves dazzling fire displays and (probably quite cold) painted performers. It’s a once-in-a-lifetime spectacle!

Where to try a British pie in Edinburgh?

Where to try a British pie in Edinburgh?

It is a well-known fact that British people love pies. Not to be confused with American-style pies which are mostly sweet, the ultimate British comfort food is a delicious, golden pastry wrapped around a succulent, meaty filling. We love pies so much that last week we celebrated British Pie week.

Watch our last video to find out where to do to taste some delicious pies.

 

 

If you are in Edinburgh, here are some other great places to try one: 

1. The Piemaker, South Bridge

A photo posted by Jessie Roasa (@jessiearrrrr) on

A popular place in the city centre offering over 30 different meat, vegetarian and sweet pies.

 

2. Ghillie Dhu, West End

A photo posted by @christophritz on

The Ghillie Dhu’s Ceilidh dances hold a regular spot on our social programme and their bar menu includes a great selection of pies.

 

3. The Dogs, Hanover Street

A great venue for a sit-down dinner or lunch, The Dogs’ menu often includes creative meat or vegetable pies.

 

4. Storries Home Bakery, Leith Walk

A photo posted by John-Paul Mason (@jipfast) on

This bakery offers a great selection of pies and opens very early in the morning.

 

5. Stephen’s Bakery

Sadly there isn’t a Stephen’s Bakery shop in Edinburgh (the nearest one is in Dunfermline!) but luckily you can still get your hands on one of their delicious pies at most Scotmid and Co-Op supermarkets around the city!

 

Scottish winter is beautiful – 14 breath-taking pictures of Edinburgh in the snow

Scottish winter is beautiful – 14 breath-taking pictures of Edinburgh in the snow

The face of Edinburgh changes with every season. In winter, you can rediscover the city in a whole new light. After last night’s snowfall, we were happy to wake up this morning to a blanket of snow, a big blue sky and bright sunshine.

Here is a selection of 14 beautiful pictures of Edinburgh under the snow:

Spectacular humpback whale in front of Edinburgh Castle

Spectacular humpback whale in front of Edinburgh Castle

Picture by Adrian Plumb

The moment a humpback whale breached from the water in front of Edinburgh Castle has been captured by a photographer. Birdwatcher Adrian Plumb got more than he bargained for when he caught an “image of a lifetime” while looking for a tiny bird. Birdwatcher snaps surprise whale shot in front of castle. The mammal was spotted surfacing against the striking backdrop in the Firth of Forth. He managed to capture spectacular pictures of a humpback whale in front of Edinburgh Castle. The huge mammal was swimming in the Firth of Forth while Adrian looked on from Kinghorn in Fife.

A number of the huge mammals were pictured in the Firth of Forth over the weekend, with some sightings also reported on Monday.

 

Explore Edinburgh in Pictures

Explore Edinburgh in Pictures

Our resident photographer, Louison has been exploring Edinburgh since the beginning of February and has managed to capture the essence of its beauty in these breathtaking photographs. Even in the winter months, it’s easy to see why Edinburgh is frequently voted one of the most beautiful cities in the world.

Here is a selection of some of our favourite photographs of Edinburgh:

Happy St Andrew’s Day 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿 Latha fèill Anndrais sona dhuibh 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

Happy St Andrew’s Day 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿 Latha fèill Anndrais sona dhuibh 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

St. Andrew’s Day is here, giving us a chance to celebrate and remember the patron saint of Scotland. The date is being marked by a Google Doodle – but who was St Andrew and is today a public holiday for people living in Scotland?

St. Andrew’s Day (or in Scottish Gaelic, ‘Là Naomh Anndrais’) is a bank holiday in Scotland, marking the country’s patron saint. It’s the feast day of Saint Andrew and is celebrated on the 30th November each year. Saint Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland, and St. Andrew’s Day is Scotland’s official national day.

Although most commonly associated with Scotland, Saint Andrew is also the patron saint of Greece, Romania and Russia. In Germany, the feast day is celebrated as Andreasnacht (“St. Andrew’s Night“), in Austria with the custom of Andreasgebet (“St. Andrew’s Prayer“), and in Poland as Andrzejki (“Andrews”).

St Andrew’s Day, the perfect excuse to try all the traditional Scottish meals! 

 

For St. Andrew’s Day you’ll certainly see the national flag everywhere. However, do you know the origin of the Scottish flag? According to legend, in 832 A.D. King Óengus II (or King Angus) led the Picts and Scots in battle against the Angles, King Angus and his men were surrounded and he prayed for deliverance. During the night Saint Andrew, who was martyred on a saltire cross, appeared to Angus and assured him of victory. On the following morning, a white saltire against the background of a blue sky appeared to both sides. The Picts and Scots were heartened by this, but the Angles lost confidence and were defeated. This saltire design has been the Scottish flag ever since.

How to say ‘Happy St Andrew’s Day’ in Scottish Gaelic

To really get into the the St Andrew’s Day spirit you should say: Latha fèill Anndrais sona dhut when you want to say it to one person and Latha fèill Anndrais sona dhuibh when you want to wish a Happy St Andrew’s Day to a group of people.