21 English Words That Are Actually German

21 English Words That Are Actually German

You may have noticed that the German language often gets a bad rap. Especially among English speakers.

People often say it sounds “guttural” or “rough,” or that German speakers are “always shouting.” That perception is doubtless due in no small part to countless World War II movies where the Germans are the bad guys constantly shouting things like Schnell! Schnell! (“Quickly! Quickly!”).

English speakers often think that English and German are on completely separate paths that don’t overlap. However, the truth is actually quite different. If you speak English, then there are likely many German words in your daily speech that you may not have even known came from German.

Both languages have borrowed liberally from each other to form their own vocabulary, and today we’ll talk about some of the most common, interesting, useful and odd German words in use in English.

20 English Words That Are Actually German (Infographic)
Source: www.grammarcheck.net

Meet The Maker – The Gin Distiller

Meet The Maker – The Gin Distiller

Did you know that 70% of the UK’s gin is produced in Scotland?

“Scotland has got a rich heritage of distilling …” according to Isle of Harris Distillery production manager Kenny Maclean. But this doesn’t just apply to our world-renowned single malt Scotch whisky.

 

Well-known brands such as Gordon’s, Tanqueray and Hendricks are produced here, but there’s also been a surge in the production of small-batch handcrafted artisan gins resulting in a wonderful selection of over 100 gins, produced by over 50 makers, to choose from. Some offer visitor and tasting experiences and some even offer the opportunity to try making your own.

The Visual Guide to English Prepositions (Time) Part 2/2

The Visual Guide to English Prepositions (Time) Part 2/2

Prepositions are short words (on, in, to) that usually stand in front of nouns (sometimes also in front of gerund verbs). Even advanced learners of English find prepositions difficult, as a 1:1 translation is usually not possible. One preposition in your native language might have several translations depending on the situation. There are hardly any rules as to when to use which preposition. The only way to learn prepositions is looking them up in a dictionary, reading a lot in English and learning useful phrases off by heart.

The Visual Guide to English Prepositions Part 2/2 (Infographic)
Source: www.grammarcheck.net